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At O’Brien & Eggleston PLLC, our Albany criminal defense attorneys have handled all types of criminal cases together for over a decade. Having worked alongside each other for most of their careers, our Albany County defense lawyers have witnessed countless court orders be passed down to clients while we build their unique defense strategies.

Criminal Court Order

A court order is a directive issued by a judge or a court that requires a person or entity to do or refrain from doing something. New York court orders can cover various issues in criminal, civil, family, and administrative law. They have one thing in common: they are legally binding and must be obeyed.

Violating a criminal court order in New York can have serious legal consequences, including fines, imprisonment, and additional charges. Here, we discuss the different types of criminal court orders and what happens if you violate them.

What are the Different Types of Criminal Court Orders in New York?

In New York, criminal court orders are typically associated with defendants’ initial charges.

They include, but are not limited to:

  • Orders of Protection: Issued to protect victims of domestic violence or other crimes.
  • Restraining Orders: Orders limiting contact or proximity to another person.
  • Bail Conditions: Orders setting the terms for a defendant’s release from custody before trial.
  • Probation Conditions: Orders setting the terms for a defendant’s probation.

Compliance with court orders is crucial to avoid legal repercussions and ensure the judicial system’s integrity. If you are subject to a court order, it is essential to understand its terms and seek legal advice if you have any questions or concerns about compliance.

What are the Consequences of Violating a Court Order in New York?

Violating a criminal court order in New York carries significant legal consequences.

They may include, but are not limited to:

  • Arrest and Detention

Violating a court order can result in immediate arrest. For example, if you violate a protective order by contacting the protected person, you can be arrested on the spot.

  • Criminal Charges

Violating a court order is a crime in itself. You can be charged with contempt of court or other relevant offenses.

The severity of the charge depends on the nature of the violation, and may include:

  • Criminal Contempt: Violating a court order can lead to criminal contempt charges, which may be classified as a misdemeanor or felony, depending on the circumstances.
  • Additional Charges: Depending on the violation, you might face further charges, including harassment, stalking, or assault if the breach involved contact with a protected person.

What are the Penalties for Violating a Court Order in New York?

Violating a court order in New York can result in various penalties depending on the type of order violated and the circumstances surrounding the violation.

Some of the most common penalties include:

  • Fines: You may be required to pay substantial penalties.
  • Extended Probation or Bail Conditions: Violations can lead to extended or stricter conditions for probation, bail, or bail revocation and order you to be held in custody until your trial.
  • Imprisonment: Violating a court order can result in jail or prison time. The length of imprisonment varies depending on the severity of the violation and whether it is a misdemeanor or felony.

Violating a court order can negatively impact your ongoing criminal case. The court may view your violation as evidence of bad character or non-compliance, which can affect the outcome of your case. If you are accused of violating a court order, obtaining legal representation is crucial to protecting your rights and effectively navigating the legal process.

Contact Our Criminal Defense Attorney Today

Contact our Albany criminal defense attorneys at O’Brien & Eggleston PLLC today by calling (518)-391-2369 or online to ensure your rights are protected throughout your case. We have a strong track record of producing real results for our clients. Allow us to pursue a positive outcome for your case, too.

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The information on this website is for general information purposes only. Nothing on this site should be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship.

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