×

Address

At O’Brien & Eggleston PLLC, our criminal defense attorneys in Albany know that people hear all types of legal phrases on television—especially with the popularity of real crime series—including someone charged with “accessory to a crime.”

In New York, being charged as an accessory to a crime means you are accused of helping or encouraging someone else to commit a crime. The law distinguishes between an “accessory before the fact” and an “accessory after the fact.”

The seriousness of being an accessory to a crime lies in the active role played in supporting or facilitating criminal behavior. The legal system seeks to hold all parties accountable to maintain justice, deter future crimes, and protect public safety.

Accessory to a Crime Charges

Our Albany County defense attorneys help our clients create customized legal strategies that allow them to pursue the best outcome for their unique cases involving these serious charges.

What is Accessory Before the Fact in New York?

An accessory before the fact is someone who assists, encourages, or helps plan a crime but is not present when the crime is committed.

Examples include:

  • Encouraging or persuading someone to commit the crime.
  • Helping to plan or orchestrate the crime.
  • Providing information or tools used in the crime.

The legal consequences of being an accessory before the fact typically involve facing the same penalties as the principal offender. If the crime is a felony, you can be charged with that felony as if you were directly involved in committing it.

What is Accessory After the Fact in New York?

An accessory after the fact is someone who helps a perpetrator avoid arrest or prosecution after the crime has been committed.

Examples include:

  • Destroying or concealing evidence.
  • Helping the criminal escape or hide from law enforcement.
  • Providing false information to law enforcement to protect criminals.

The legal penalties for an accessory after the fact can be severe but are generally less than those for being an accessory before the fact. Charges might include obstruction of justice or hindering prosecution, which can carry significant fines and imprisonment.

Understanding the specifics of your situation and the charges against you can help you navigate the legal process more effectively.

Contact Our Criminal Defense Attorney Today

Contact our Albany criminal defense attorneys at O’Brien & Eggleston PLLC today by calling (518)-391-2369 or online to ensure your rights are protected from the start, including as early as police questioning so we can design a defense strategy to pursue the best outcome for your unique charges. We have a strong track record of producing real results for our clients. Allow us to seek a positive outcome for your case, too.

Related Posts


Can I Be Arrested in New York for Drugs that Weren’t Mine?

At O’Brien & Eggleston PLLC, our Albany criminal defense attorneys know there is much confusion about who can be charged with a drug crime when…

Is Leaving the Scene of a Vehicle Accident a Crime in New York?

Our Albany criminal defense attorneys at O’Brien & Eggleston PLLC know that leaving the scene of a crash in New York has greater consequences than…

What Does Accessory to a Crime Charges Mean in New York?

At O’Brien & Eggleston PLLC, our criminal defense attorneys in Albany know that people hear all types of legal phrases on television—especially with the popularity…

The information on this website is for general information purposes only. Nothing on this site should be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship.

© 2024 All Rights Reserved.

amn-logo